Friday, April 5, 2019

Open House London | The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Building

For one weekend every year, the Open House London celebrates the city, its great architecture, the histories of old buildings and the virtues of new ones. Last September was my first visit to the Open House and I was lucky enough to explore few buildings over the weekend, The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Building on Whitehall being one of them.

Although the Foreign Office dates back to 1782 when the first Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Charles James Fox was appointed; the glorious building which we see today houses The Foreign and India Office quarters which were started in 1861 and took 7 years to complete, opening in 1868. And The Colonial and Home Office sections were then started and completed in 1875. 

The architectural style of this building revels in the juxtaposition of the work of  two great architects - George Gilbert Scott, a leading architect of the Gothic Revival style whose famous works include The St. Pancras Renaissance London Hotel and The Albert Memorial, and Matthew Digby Wyatt who was the Surveyor of the East India Company in 1855 and subsequently became Architect to the Council of India.

We first enter into the richly decorated Durbar Court. 'Durbar' was the term used in Mughal India where Indian Kings and other rulers had their formal and informal meetings and was adopted by the British to refer to a ceremonial gathering to demonstrate loyalty to the crown. Wyatt sure did bring the grandiose to this courtyard - it was the old India office from where the subcontinent was governed for almost a century. Around the three floored Durbar court are statues of men from British India. A reminder of our histories, both different narratives, right? I was not very comfortable seeing the imperial rulers on a pedestal, but there they were - Robert Clive, Commander-in-Chief of British India, infamous for the Battle of Plassey, for his atrocities committed on Indian peasants, high taxes and for facing trial in England because of the enormous personal fortune he earned in India; Warren Hastings, the first de facto Governor-General of India from 1773 to 1785; and Minto (Gilbert John Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound) of the Minto-Morley Reforms.

But let's get back to the stunning architecture. Here are some pictures I took that day.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Creating Balance & Embracing Your Multipotentialite Personality

“Balance is not something you find,
It’s something you create.”


Scanner, Renaissance person, Multipotentialite...ever heard of these terms?


Of course, you must know the more common saying, ‘Jack of all trades’?


‘Jack of all trades, master of none’ said the world, But you know what they left out?


‘Jack of all trades, master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one


The world had us believe that being well-versed in multiple disciplines was a limitation or an affliction that one had to
overcome. And so, many like me, who dabbled in multiple passions as a kid, was forced to choose one path as an
adult, find their one true calling or choose a one dimensional career.


It took me years to unlearn what the world had fed me, and finally appreciate and embrace my ‘multipotentialite’
personality. A big big shout out to Emilie Wapnick, who coined this term and whose TED talk had me furiously nodding
all along.


In my transition from a 9-5 banking professional to an entrepreneur, I have had to push past many fears. A major
struggle, one that often still overwhelms me, are balancing my multiple passions. I am a freelance writer
and photographer, and building a dance start up from ground zero. Also a dancer, a blogger, by default a project
manager, and an aspiring ‘best selling author’.


Expanding. Exploring. Learning. Growing.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Flash Fiction: Telling a Story In a Few Words

A few years ago, I published my first Ebook of flash fiction on Amazon Kindle called 26. These are twenty six stories,
each written in just one day as part of a blogging challenge. And since then, I’ve fallen in love with this form of writing.
But let me admit, I didn’t know of the term ‘flash fiction’ until just a few months before I started writing them.

So, let's start with the basic question.

What is flash fiction?

The exact definition may vary, but it is the modern term used for short stories, usually under 500 words in length.
The key is, they still need to be complete stories in themselves, whatever the agreed word limit, be it 1500 or
300 words.

There are many writers who play with this theme of writing short stories; we’ve heard terms such as short-short stories,
immediate fiction, sudden fiction, microfiction, the 100-word pieces, the 55-ers and the terribly tiny tales. These all
come under the umbrella of flash fiction. But the best example of flash fiction, which uses the skill of brevity to a T is,
Ernest Hemingway who gave us the six word story:

For Sale: Baby Shoes, Never Worn
These short, swiftly written, and transient narratives can be as powerful as the complexly constructed lines of
drawn-out prose.

Saturday, February 23, 2019

February And Traces Of You | Thought Catalog


My words can now be found on Thought Catalog! Here's a snippet from my poem 'February and Traces of You'


A pot of black coffee getting cold 
Scattered letters with missing feelings and some words. 
Ink stains on my hands and burn stains in my heart, 
I try and piece my broken heart together. 
I lost love and friendship, all at once, when you walked out; 
I’m not sure how to go on without you now, 
you were the one who was supposed to stay… 

Saturday, February 9, 2019

How to Explore the Best of Chinatown London in a Day

London's Chinatown is always bursting with energy. It is a riot of flavours, smells, textures and colours waiting to be explored. And with the start of the Year of the Pig (5th February) Londoners and tourists alike are heading to the city's Oriental wonderland, eating and drinking their way through dumplings, pig-shaped macarons and everything in between.

I spent last Saturday evening wandering through its many streets, and here's my list of the best of Chinatown London.



Tuesday, January 22, 2019

10 Free (Budget) Things to Do in London: January & February 2019

I entered 2019 with no word of the year. No intentions.

This might have been an attempt to try and not hold on too tight, to keep the pressures of life at bay. But mostly, it was a reminder to trust yourself, trust the process and be fluid. To find your inner light, be your best self and let each day flow from one to the next. 
I am surprised how magnetically things are taking shape and how in control I am, by not holding on too tight, and keeping things fluid. With plenty of room for the unexpected and serendipity, so far this month I have taken a short weekend trip to Aberdeen, submitted an article to a magazine I've been wanting to write for since a long time, attended a wonderful evening of cocktails and canapés at the media launch of the dazzling new Soho Residence, started planning for my next two dance movement workshops, and drafted a short story for a creative writing competition.

Being fluid has also helped me to do more, see more, and be more. Here's a list of 10 free or budget friendly things to do in London that are in my diary.

Monday, December 24, 2018

Twinkle in the Sky - Christmas in London

All you need to do these days, to rise above from the grey, gloomy weather, is to look up and see the twinkle in the sky! Have you had the chance to see the Christmas lights in the city?

Last year, I was lucky enough to be in Seven Dials at the live switch-on moment and what a special experience it was. There was a mega choir that made everyone on the streets sing along to Christmas tunes, free wreath making, mulled wine and hot chocolate, pop up shops and blitz and joy at every corner.

This year, though I missed out on making it to any lights switch on events, I made my way to some popular spots to ring in the festivities! If you are in London this time of the year, here's my mini-guide to see the best of Christmas lights in the city.

Christmas is Calling Sign at Oxford Street

This sets the tone! Christmas is Calling, at London!


Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Showing Appreciation to Your Parents by Having Conversations that Matter

My fifty-seven and sixty-one year olds just announced that they signed up for Amazon Prime and are binge watching, wait for it, Grey’s Anatomy. Whaaat?

This was after they had finished Downton Abbey in just a couple of nights. A week living their lives as two twentysomethings, my dad complained of a sprained neck. It was then that I learnt, they had been glued to their television set way past their bedtimes!

“You need to cut down your TV-watching time, folks! Just two episodes in a day. Okay?” I said sternly.

Later, my sister and I, amused remembered the innumerable times the same dialogue had been aimed at us when we were in school.

How the tables have turned!

Saturday, December 1, 2018

Things to Do in London - December Edit | Aditi's Pen

Make it a December to Remember!

How did it get so late so soon? I can hear everyone saying. But I am not complaining. December is lined up with very merry events. From something to fire up my creative belly to tingle my taste buds at the many Christmas markets in the city!

So, here's my December Edit of Things to do in London. These are all the events I plan to attend; there is so much to do in this city and this by no means is an exhaustive list, just me on my mini adventures this month.


Saturday, November 24, 2018

Finding Autumn Magic in the New Forest | Aditi's Pen

If you follow me on Instagram, you'll know I'm a teeny bit obsessed with Autumn. The transition from the greens of summer to the stunning autumn colours is magical. And though this cosy weather is on its way out, we held on to it a tad bit longer as we spent a day in New Forest a few weeks back.

Only about a 90-minute train ride from London’s Waterloo Station, the New Forest was the perfect base for us to enjoy long woodland walks, snug reading nights in front of a crackling fireplace, and leisurely pub dinners.

“Autumn carries more gold in its pocket than all the other seasons.” 
― Jim Bishop