Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The Four Conversations

The Partition of India in 1947 left not a mark but a scar in millions of people's minds, hearts and bodies. A mark, though, it did leave on the writings that emerged after that dark night. When the national boundaries were being redrawn, several stories - of violence, hatred, rape, murder, 'cold' tolerance, dilemma, bewilderment, frustration - were being drawn from this catastrophic event.

A new literature emerged.

From Saadat Hasan Manto's ' Toba Tek Singh' to Khushwant Singh's 'A Train to Pakistan' to Amitava Ghosh's 'Shadow Lines', stories were born and a whole generation, like me, who had no first hand experience of the partition, felt our souls stir by their words. Personally for me, fiction has proved a greater reservoir of truth and knowledge than any history book.

This historic event infused seeds for some great prose and poetry across many Indian languages, predominantly Bangla and Punjabi, Bengal and Punjab being the most affected areas of the divide. Many of us limited in our understanding of these languages and inept at their translations, have unfortunately missed a great deal of rich regional texts surrounding this event.

'The Four Quarters Magazine' which in their own words believe in a "divisible but unified world where all the quarters, the four principal quarters with their composite sub-quarters meet together to form one whole sphere of existence", are giving us - the people from "all four quarters" - an opportunity to revisit few works, few stories, few translations pertaining to this post partition literature. 'The Four Conversations', an event being hosted by the magazine on 16th February 2014 in New Delhi will see speakers from different spheres - authors, poets, translators, filmmakers, performance artists, journalists - coming together and sharing with us their opinions, experiences and perspectives on Bordering, Translation...

http://tfqmagazine.org/conversations/

For more details on the speakers, event schedule and venue details, please visit here.
Follow the event on Facebook and Twitter

As Vishwajyoti Ghosh, the curator of the graphic novel ' This Side That Side', and a key speaker at the event, said "Partition is not only about the exodus but about the little Partitions that we carry in our heads", so let's meet this Sunday, 16th Feb and clear our heads of the myths, speculations and curiosity of what had happened and instead reprocess, restore and retell the stories that will continue to mark our beings for generations to follow.

22 comments:

  1. Interesting! I received an invite to this! :) Thanks for sharing, Aditi!

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    1. Thank you Vidya :) Wish you could have come...hoping we have more such events!

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  2. That was really interesting...Thanks for sharing Aditi ... :)

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  3. Nice informative article!!
    Regards
    my new post
    http://travelagent-india.blogspot.in/2014/02/experience-vivacious-mumbai-and-goa.html

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  4. I had received your invite and was a bit confused on content until now.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Will try to join and also check with others around.

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    1. You should have come Sugandha...it was really an insightful event!

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  5. Lovely dear aditi! And this seems like an great oppurtunity I will be forced to miss :( but well you continue the amazing work love <3

    Richa

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  6. Sounds very interesting!! Wonderful that you are highlighting it here. ♥

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  7. Sounds interesting event and must worth listening!

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  8. This is truly a great effort to dwell on the richness of a shared culture, Aditi. I hope you enjoyed it.

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    1. True Corinne but more than that the event brought out for me how yet again politics was the main reason our country stood divided! And how the ill effects of that day still tend to play a role in today's generation too. Hope to capture the essence of the 'Four Conversations' in another post!

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